Maker Pro
Maker Pro

Where to buy LED flashlights in New York City?

W

wylbur37

Jan 1, 1970
0
LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.

But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them. Radio Shack, for example, sells actual LEDs if you want to
make your own, but they don't seem to sell ready-made LED flashlights.

Does anyone know of some retail stores in the New York City area that
sell LED flashlights?
 
J

Jerry G.

Jan 1, 1970
0
I have seen them in some of the serious type camping stores. Here in
Montreal, I have seen a few types in the Radio Shack stores. Apparently, I
am told that they are not yet selling as well as the conventional type. I am
told that one of the disadvantages are, is that they are still not as bright
as the light bulb type.

I bought a few keychain holders with one of these. It is good in the dark to
find the key-hole, or look for something that does not require a powerful
illumination.

--

Greetings,

Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
=========================================
WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
=========================================


LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.

But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them. Radio Shack, for example, sells actual LEDs if you want to
make your own, but they don't seem to sell ready-made LED flashlights.

Does anyone know of some retail stores in the New York City area that
sell LED flashlights?
 
L

Lewin A.R.W. Edwards

Jan 1, 1970
0
But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them. Radio Shack, for example, sells actual LEDs if you want to
make your own, but they don't seem to sell ready-made LED flashlights.

How big do you want them?? 99c stores sell keychain units in a variety
of colors (not white, though). Pathmark sells small white-LED keychain
units.
 
D

Dave VanHorn

Jan 1, 1970
0
wylbur37 said:
LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.

But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them.

Wal-Mart, Target, any camping store should carry them.
They're easy to find here in nowhere indiana..

The one I like, is usually at knife stores, the Inova X-5
White, Red, Green, Blue, or UV wavelengths available.
 
M

Michael

Jan 1, 1970
0
Jerry G. said:
I have seen them in some of the serious type camping stores. Here in
Montreal, I have seen a few types in the Radio Shack stores. Apparently, I
am told that they are not yet selling as well as the conventional type. I am
told that one of the disadvantages are, is that they are still not as bright
as the light bulb type.

I bought a few keychain holders with one of these. It is good in the dark to
find the key-hole, or look for something that does not require a powerful
illumination.

--

Greetings,

Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
=========================================
WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
=========================================

LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.

But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them. Radio Shack, for example, sells actual LEDs if you want to
make your own, but they don't seem to sell ready-made LED flashlights.

Does anyone know of some retail stores in the New York City area that
sell LED flashlights?


Another drawback is the painfully high price. And if you want the
ability to focus the beam, as can be done with a MagLite, you will be
disappointed with an LED light. No, although LED flashlights are OK for
some close-in work (e.g. finding a keyhole), they don't replace a
standard flashlight.

But as for finding in NYC, what's wrong with ordering from the web?
 
J

Jeff Wiseman

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael said:
Another drawback is the painfully high price.


Yes, but in many applications it can be more than justified.

And if you want the
ability to focus the beam, as can be done with a MagLite, you will be
disappointed with an LED light. No, although LED flashlights are OK for
some close-in work (e.g. finding a keyhole), they don't replace a
standard flashlight.


Not true. For example, have a look at the following review on the EverLED--a regulated high intensity LED that is a direct drop in replacement for a normal "PR" type flashbulb and will work with anything from 1 to 6 cells. With a standard 2 cell flashlight it has nearly 3 times the throw and 3 times the total light output (these are different) of a standard bulb (not to mention that the batteries will last 4-7 times longer with it! Don't forget the cost of batteries). Notice that it also has a diffuse type dispersion pattern so it WILL focus with a Mag's adjustable lens.

http://flashlightreviews3.home.att.net/reviews/everled.htm

The problem it that even though there are many different types of LED based flashlites on the market, most of them at present are marketing gimmicks and just plain garbage. There are some that are truely innovative--a little expensive but comparable to the many other LED models out there and many of them aren't evwen sold in retail stores yet. There are some really good ones. ARC's most recent model (the ARC4+) is only about 3 inches long, fits in your pocket, and on its highest setting (it has 16), it is as bright as a tactical flashlight (much brighter than, say, a 6 D cell Maglight--it uses the new Luxeon star LED I believe).

I have an ARC AAA myself. It is almost as bright, more white, more evenly lit than a mini-Mag with 2 AA batteries in it. Furthermore, the ARC AAA uses only 1 AAA battery and will go for nearly 7 hours before starting to dim--the AA Mag will only last about 1.5 to 2 hours before dropping to that level. Furthermore, the LED is rated to last for 30,0000 hours or more. How many Mag-light bulbs at $4 apiece would you replace in that period of time?

For more information that is likely better than hearsay, check out the LED discussion groups at:

http://www.candlepowerforums.com

You'll be surprised at what is happening in flashlight land these days :)

- Jeff
 
B

Bob Myers

Jan 1, 1970
0
Jerry G. said:
I have seen them in some of the serious type camping stores. Here in
Montreal, I have seen a few types in the Radio Shack stores. Apparently, I
am told that they are not yet selling as well as the conventional type. I am
told that one of the disadvantages are, is that they are still not as bright
as the light bulb type.

I'm not so sure about that in the latest versions; I just got
one of these (as a freebie at a trade show, so I have no idea
what they'd cost) using a single LumiLeds white LED and
a 3V lithium battery. About the size of an "AA"-battery
Maglite, although stubbier and bit fatter - and this sucker is
BRIGHT. I haven't measured the light output, but the folks
from LumiLeds said that they're pushing into the 100-1000
lumens range with their LEDs. I can easily see a flashlight
using several of these LEDs as being more than
bright enough to replace my trusty 3-cell Maglite.

Bob M.
 
J

jakdedert

Jan 1, 1970
0
Bob said:
I'm not so sure about that in the latest versions; I just got
one of these (as a freebie at a trade show, so I have no idea
what they'd cost) using a single LumiLeds white LED and
a 3V lithium battery. About the size of an "AA"-battery
Maglite, although stubbier and bit fatter - and this sucker is
BRIGHT. I haven't measured the light output, but the folks
from LumiLeds said that they're pushing into the 100-1000
lumens range with their LEDs. I can easily see a flashlight
using several of these LEDs as being more than
bright enough to replace my trusty 3-cell Maglite.

I totally agree (and have--previously--in this forum). I used mini-mags at
work for years. In the last five years, my flashlight of choice is my
three-AA C. Crane flashlight. There's just no comparison. If you want a
focused beam, a mini-mag is just not the ticket, anyway. It doesn't have
enough oomph to get farther than ten feet or so, and only emits a really
powerful beam for a matter of minutes before starting to dim--and that's
only with a new bulb--as the bulb itself starts to 'silver up' like an old
radio tube before you know it. Drop it while illuminated, and you're
fumbling around in the dark for the spare bulb (unless you've already used
it, then you're SOL). I can juggle, drop, kick or use my flashlight for a
hammer, if I'm so inclined. "Takes a lickin' and...."

My flashlight provides sustained high output for 100 hours on a set of AA's
(and will remain useful for 50 hours past that point). I *never* have to
replace the 'bulbs.' They're as bright as the day it was delivered, five
years ago.

I think that eventually, LED's are going to almost completely overtake the
market in just a few years.

jak
 
R

R.Lewis

Jan 1, 1970
0
wylbur37 said:
LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.

But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them. Radio Shack, for example, sells actual LEDs if you want to
make your own, but they don't seem to sell ready-made LED flashlights.

Does anyone know of some retail stores in the New York City area that
sell LED flashlights?

I would have thought that the CRI of white leds is so poor that they would
be of little use in photography - or do the cameras do something clever when
using these light sources?
 
J

Jim Yanik

Jan 1, 1970
0
UH,could you please set your news agent to 80 character line length,the
standard for UseNet?
 
T

the Wiz

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael said:
Another drawback is the painfully high price. And if you want the
ability to focus the beam, as can be done with a MagLite, you will be
disappointed with an LED light. No, although LED flashlights are OK for
some close-in work (e.g. finding a keyhole), they don't replace a
standard flashlight.

But as for finding in NYC, what's wrong with ordering from the web?

There are some VERY bright LED flashlights available, at appreciably higher
prices than the "keyhole" lights. Technology Associates http://www.techass.com
has a broad selection of lights, including a drop-in replacement for the bulb in
the MiniMag lights.
Can't report on how bright they really are (yet), the one I ordered will be
delivered next week ;-)

The primary value of LED flashlights is their long battery life and (almost)
eternal LED life.

More about me: http://www.jecarter.com/
VB3/VB6/C/PowerBasic source code: http://www.jecarter.com/programs.html
Freeware for the Palm with NS Basic source code: http://nsb.jecarter.com
Drivers for Pablo graphics tablet and JamCam cameras: http://home.earthlink.net/~mwbt/
johnecarter [email protected] mindspring dot.dot com. Fix the obvious to reply by email.
 
K

Ken Weitzel

Jan 1, 1970
0
R.Lewis said:
I would have thought that the CRI of white leds is so poor that they would
be of little use in photography - or do the cameras do something clever when
using these light sources?

Some, or perhaps now most, of the top of the line scanners
use them for a light source in place of those short lived
cold cathode flourescents...

Take care.

Ken
 
K

Ken Weitzel

Jan 1, 1970
0
Dave said:
Wal-Mart, Target, any camping store should carry them.
They're easy to find here in nowhere indiana..

The one I like, is usually at knife stores, the Inova X-5
White, Red, Green, Blue, or UV wavelengths available.


WalMart, at least here in Canada, even offers them as
replacement auto bulbs - plug in replacements for
brake lights, back up, turn signals, etc. A little
pricey, but probably reasonable pay back when you
toss in the safety factor of no burnt out brake lights,
etc.

Take care.

Ken
 
J

Jerry G.

Jan 1, 1970
0
Hi Bob,

I am going to shop around again, if this is the case. A few months back, I
was not as impressed as with a conventional lamp.

I was reading an article about a year ago, that was explaining that in a few
more years, we will be able to have our homes lit on LED technology.

I am now seeing more and more new models of automobiles using LEDs for the
rear lights.

--

Greetings,

Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
=========================================
WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
=========================================



Jerry G. said:
I have seen them in some of the serious type camping stores. Here in
Montreal, I have seen a few types in the Radio Shack stores. Apparently, I
am told that they are not yet selling as well as the conventional type. I am
told that one of the disadvantages are, is that they are still not as bright
as the light bulb type.

I'm not so sure about that in the latest versions; I just got
one of these (as a freebie at a trade show, so I have no idea
what they'd cost) using a single LumiLeds white LED and
a 3V lithium battery. About the size of an "AA"-battery
Maglite, although stubbier and bit fatter - and this sucker is
BRIGHT. I haven't measured the light output, but the folks
from LumiLeds said that they're pushing into the 100-1000
lumens range with their LEDs. I can easily see a flashlight
using several of these LEDs as being more than
bright enough to replace my trusty 3-cell Maglite.

Bob M.
 
J

Jerry G.

Jan 1, 1970
0
I have seen some UV LED flashlights. To me, these are a sort of novelty.
But, what would be the practical use for a UV LED type flashlight? I found
the power level to also be very low.

--

Greetings,

Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
=========================================
WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
=========================================



wylbur37 said:
LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.

But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them.

Wal-Mart, Target, any camping store should carry them.
They're easy to find here in nowhere indiana..

The one I like, is usually at knife stores, the Inova X-5
White, Red, Green, Blue, or UV wavelengths available.
 
R

R.Lewis

Jan 1, 1970
0
Ken Weitzel said:
Some, or perhaps now most, of the top of the line scanners
use them for a light source in place of those short lived
cold cathode flourescents...

Take care.

I can appreciate that, within certain limits, the CRI of the lightsource
doesn't matter in a scanner since it is always the same lightsource and can
be compensated for.
In a camera how does it know that the lightsource is a led, what type of
led, and how does it compensate for what is a very poor CRI.
Or are (most of) the cameras users just not bothered?
 
J

Jeff Wiseman

Jan 1, 1970
0
I screwed up my line wrap in my original post--here it is again
with correction. Sorry all.
 
W

Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\

Jan 1, 1970
0
Michael wrote:
Yes, but in many applications it can be more than justified.


Not true. For example, have a look at the following review on the
EverLED--a regulated high intensity LED that is a direct drop in
replacement for a normal "PR" type flashbulb and will work with anything
from 1 to 6 cells. With a standard 2 cell flashlight it has nearly 3
times the throw and 3 times the total light output (these are different)
of a standard bulb (not to mention that the batteries will last 4-7
times longer with it! Don't forget the cost of batteries). Notice that
it also has a diffuse type dispersion pattern so it WILL focus with a
Mag's adjustable lens.

I agree on some points, disagree on others. The lifetime of the LED is
much greater, saving bulb replacement. But the Luxeon Star takes 350
mA, and it will eat up batteries just as fast as a regular bulb. You
say 4 to 7 times longer, but it may be a lot less than that. And it's
$40, which is much more than a good maglite costs.
The problem it that even though there are many different types of LED
based flashlites on the market, most of them at present are marketing
gimmicks and just plain garbage. There are some that are truely
innovative--a little expensive but comparable to the many other LED
models out there and many of them aren't evwen sold in retail stores
yet. There are some really good ones. ARC's most recent model (the
ARC4+) is only about 3 inches long, fits in your pocket, and on its
highest setting (it has 16), it is as bright as a tactical flashlight
(much brighter than, say, a 6 D cell Maglight--it uses the new Luxeon
star LED I believe).

The sacrifice many small flashlights make is they use lithium batteris,
which are smaller and lighter than alkalines, but cost more per wat of
power. So if you're a heavy user, you will pay much more. The cheapest
is to get rechargeable C or D cells, and carry a spare charged set. I
haven't yet seen a drop-in rechargeable replacement for a lithium cell
such as the CR-123.
I have an ARC AAA myself. It is almost as bright, more white, more
evenly lit than a mini-Mag with 2 AA batteries in it. Furthermore, the
ARC AAA uses

I have both, right in my hand, and I don't believe what you're saying.
The Arc AAA is only a single LED, the AA cell mini maglite has much more
light output.

only 1 AAA battery and will go for nearly 7 hours before starting to
dim--the AA Mag will only last about 1.5 to 2 hours before dropping to
that level.

That's because the maglite's regular bulb puts out more light and uses
more power.
Furthermore, the LED is rated to last for 30,0000 hours or more. How many
Mag-light bulbs at $4 apiece would you replace in that period of time?

That's the main advantage of LEDs, they last longer. And they don't
change to yellowish amber light when the batteries get weak.
For more information that is likely better than hearsay, check out the
LED discussion groups at:

Yeah, hearsay, that's what I call much of your information. :-O
 
W

Watson A.Name - \Watt Sun, the Dark Remover\

Jan 1, 1970
0
wylbur37 said:
LED flashlights seem to be getting more popular these days. There are
numerous websites that sell them, of different types and sizes.
But here in New York City, I have yet to find a retail store that
sells them. Radio Shack, for example, sells actual LEDs if you want to
make your own, but they don't seem to sell ready-made LED flashlights.
Does anyone know of some retail stores in the New York City area that
sell LED flashlights?

DOrcy has some good LED flashlight buys in OSH, and other retail stores.
Check out their website. http://www.dorcy.com/led new.htm
 
Top