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Who Here is into Arduino & Raspberry Pi. Are You Also Serious About Electronics?

John R Retired

Mar 13, 2022
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Underlying these questions is the significance TODAY of these Microcontroller devices,
compared to the significance of Pure Electronics, although they are related.

In other words, a lot of non-electronics people are into Arduino project "Making", with minimal
electronics knowledge and are focused on the software programming of the Microcontrollers
rather than "electronics" design and circuit design per se'

Also, other than the Hobby aspect, which road of pursuit would allow you to make some extra money,
(creating new devices) and spending your valuable time on the bench?

People who are financially set and have lots of free time to casually pursue "Hobby fun", much like
some people pursue gardening, need not reply.
 

John R Retired

Mar 13, 2022
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I think you have asked this previously and the same answers apply to micros.

It would seem that the answers would be different since Microcontrollers are more advanced and contemporary than regular electronics, and are software - programming based, which opens up more possibilities than hard wired electronics circuits.
More "possibilities"..
 

Bluejets

Oct 5, 2014
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You asked, I replied, then you argue the outcome, typical kia
 

John R Retired

Mar 13, 2022
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My apologies for not accepting your reply as the final and indisputable conclusion on the subject.
 

Bob Heisenberg

Apr 10, 2022
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So basically anyone who uses a raspberry pi for embedded system use, especaily industrial control systems requiring high reliabilty and fail safe functions is a charletan who I would fire almost immediatly, I hope that answers your question.
 

Bob Heisenberg

Apr 10, 2022
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The problem is that people use the raspberry pi in all its really poorly implemented versions in embedded systems because they get taught by computer science professors who havent worked in industry for 20 years or more the old CS mantra " All embedded systems MUST have an operating system and that operating system MUST be a full blown version of linux" Having worked in embedded systems design for over 25 years Ive yet to see a convincing argument for why you would want to run linux on an embedded system over some other posssible solution.


Underlying these questions is the significance TODAY of these Microcontroller devices,
compared to the significance of Pure Electronics, although they are related.

In other words, a lot of non-electronics people are into Arduino project "Making", with minimal
electronics knowledge and are focused on the software programming of the Microcontrollers
rather than "electronics" design and circuit design per se'

Also, other than the Hobby aspect, which road of pursuit would allow you to make some extra money,
(creating new devices) and spending your valuable time on the bench?

People who are financially set and have lots of free time to casually pursue "Hobby fun", much like
some people pursue gardening, need not reply.
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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Also, other than the Hobby aspect, which road of pursuit would allow you to make some extra money,
(creating new devices) and spending your valuable time on the bench?
There are those that do this for a living but they are often 'known' within the industry as people you can rely on to create app-specific programs and/or interface to simple sensors to either repair an existing system that no longer has spares available OR create adaptations to existing systems to improve efficiency.

Programming skills often come a distant second to the creation of the 'idea' that needs a solution - just try to think of something that isn't already developed! More often the 'solution' is for a one-off issue rather than for mass production. The one occasion I recall someone making a device (Arduino) for retail use was to program i.d. codes into VHF radio sets (marine GMDSS units with DSC) and he developed it for a company he was working for and was paid 'per' on a sold basis. Even then, it's a very specific market and he wouldn't ever achieve 'wealth' by the result. He did get a lot of kudos for his efforts though.

I understand that people have a desire to put their practical knowledge to use (income) but you have to be very on-the-ball, up-to-date and resourceful to get into electronics as a market and most of the time being a part of a specific target market is the only way to achieve this i.e. I'm in the marine market (mostly) so can target that area easily - it's lucrative!

Another area that is sorely lacking skills is car electronics - my Jeep had an issue with its key detector which required me to get towed home but I commented to the tow truck driver that "I can fix it myself" and he wanted to hire me on the spot as he knows of no-one (literally) that can repair such stuff. A new module would have cost me up to $1000 to purchase and have installed - the fix was a simple solder-job (not easy but do-able).

If someone tossed you a random circuit board and you could (a) figure out what it was meant to be used for and (b) figure out how it worked just by looking at it then you might stand a chance in this kind of repair market.
 

cjdelphi

Oct 26, 2011
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How about looking at this from a different aspect, is discrete circuitry and how it works crucial in your job if all you do is knock out firmware and control the odd button and led

and even that makes you learn how to protect the io pin by limiting it with a resistor, voltage drops have to be done or you will burn out your LEDs

I started doing electronics because micro controllers got me into it, all these complex tasks uploaded to a pic I wasn't interested until usb and arduino came along, fool proof to use for complete noobs like myself at the time

but that interest got me curious about logic chips times, 555, 4017, CDblah then I built the kits then I went to simulating them and building them on breadboard and I would switch back to arduino and then back to hardware

build a current limiter with arduino without any basic electronics know how like using a shunt resistor and measuring the voltage drop across it...

it doesn't matter how great your coding skills are... without discrete electronic component knowledge you can only get so far without real help....
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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which road of pursuit would allow you to make some extra money,
You seem to have posted on multiple occasions in an effort to get someone to hand you an idea that will help make some money. You are not going to get anywhere with that approach because we know nothing about your actual skill sets, knowledge and capabilities - what we've learned in the interim doesn't seem (to me) to be anywhere near sufficient to delve into design, manufacture or even repair at the level that will give you an income. I may well be wrong on this - convince me....

More often, thinking along different lines brings a solution as sticking with the 'only' skill you possess limits your horizons - skills don't necessarily equate to income as it is possible to do something 'simple and repetitive' to create an income (mowing lawns is a bad example but illustrates my point).

In my case - as I've mentioned - injury stopped my (very) lucrative marine electronics work and I sort of 'fell' into making food where I discovered I have a particular skill and ability despite having zero learning (other than 'eating'!) - the rest was sheer determination to make it work.

Broaden your horizon and look for that niche that others seem to have missed - this is as difficult as thinking up a new product and then delving into construction, testing, manufacture etc but without knowing your local situation and the current market(s).

My previous suggestion of gasoline garden machinery (and generator) servicing works for most residential areas and isn't difficult to learn nor tool-up to achieve. Anyone with hands-on electronic skills should easily adapt to small engine work - much easier than a small engine mechanic could move into electronics repair. Even limiting yourself to testing/fault finding the electrical side of generators, without getting your hands dirty actually fixing the engine(s), could bring in money. Many people that can service their own mowers/generators etc think the electrical side is 'voodoo' even though you can do practically everything with a multimeter and a portable load!`
 

John R Retired

Mar 13, 2022
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You seem to have posted on multiple occasions in an effort to get someone to hand you an idea that will help make some money. You are not going to get anywhere with that approach because we know nothing about your actual skill sets, knowledge and capabilities - what we've learned in the interim doesn't seem (to me) to be anywhere near sufficient to delve into design, manufacture or even repair at the level that will give you an income. I may well be wrong on this - convince me....

More often, thinking along different lines brings a solution as sticking with the 'only' skill you possess limits your horizons - skills don't necessarily equate to income as it is possible to do something 'simple and repetitive' to create an income (mowing lawns is a bad example but illustrates my point).

In my case - as I've mentioned - injury stopped my (very) lucrative marine electronics work and I sort of 'fell' into making food where I discovered I have a particular skill and ability despite having zero learning (other than 'eating'!) - the rest was sheer determination to make it work.

Broaden your horizon and look for that niche that others seem to have missed - this is as difficult as thinking up a new product and then delving into construction, testing, manufacture etc but without knowing your local situation and the current market(s).

My previous suggestion of gasoline garden machinery (and generator) servicing works for most residential areas and isn't difficult to learn nor tool-up to achieve. Anyone with hands-on electronic skills should easily adapt to small engine work - much easier than a small engine mechanic could move into electronics repair. Even limiting yourself to testing/fault finding the electrical side of generators, without getting your hands dirty actually fixing the engine(s), could bring in money. Many people that can service their own mowers/generators etc think the electrical side is 'voodoo' even though you can do practically everything with a multimeter and a portable load!`

Thanks for your advice, and I am considering what you say since you seem to know the ropes.

As I told you some of this before, I was always interested in electronics as a teenager I was an aspiring Ham operator then, but mainly a SW listener, and I built that SW unit from a Heathkit type assembly, setup my antenna and started to move towards Ham .
I had a neighbor down the road who was a Tech in industry and had a 6 meter voice Ham station (with tubes) and hung around other Hams.
Then had to go in the military due to the war. Worked as communications assistant in the Navy on a ship between the transmitter and radio shack with basic electricity training. A few years later, took college classes in DC, AC, Valves, semiconductors, digital circuits, Boolean algebra, microprocessors. Worked in aerospace and manufacturing in QC electromechanical.

NOW, being retired, as I said previously, I am looking for extra part time income. Since I like electronics, (and Physics & Science) and the nature of matter , I thought
I would investigate doing something in electronics since I have some knowledge although not a hard core technician & engineer like you said you were. Electronics has obviously changed a lot over the years, and the microscopic nature of the components now, does not appeal to me as well as the "black box" throwaway economics of repair. I appreciate the fact that you went from hard core electronics to creating food to make money. That is quite a change. I could probably do something else to make some extra cash, like you did, but I thought I would explore the possibility of electronics since I am familiar with it, like it and feel comfortable in the environment around it. I see that the "Microcontroller" Arduino, Raspberry Pi craze seems to be a big thing now, and thought I would ask here about that possibility as it is associated with core electronics to a degree, but more on the periphery.
Also I have taken some older computer programming language, (NOT "C" or other new ones) but I did do some higher level software programming in manufacturing for measuring and worked with CAD models so I understand the logical thinking involved.
Anyway I just thought I'd look into making some extra money in electronics some how, came across this message board and asked around to see if anyone had some insight into that possibility. Since you are saying I don't have the experience or skills, I asked about the microcontroller aspect. It does seem like there is not much opportunity like there used to be and I see the stacks of electronic junk piling up in the waste yards, and it is considered an environmental hazard and blight, and not worth fixing, according to the economics of electronics today. So maybe all home electronics is nowadays, is reserved for the hobbyist doing it for fun and income free satisfaction except for a handful of exceptions to that rule as is always the case.
So there it is. I hope that answers your questions .
 
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Martaine2005

May 12, 2015
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Like I also said in your other thread, through hole and valve equipment to repair or restore can be lucrative.
Buy a faulty 70s or 80s audio amplifier (or earlier) and repair it for resale.
Problem is, the prices for faulty equipment now has rocketed in price. It’s a niche market for the collector or audiofool.
Watch mr Carlsons lab on YouTube, he repairs, improves and restores mainly valve equipment.
Join a ham radio club, get a feel for the equipment that is sought after. See if you could repair that sort of equipment. Then you’ll know your own skills by trying.

Martin
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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I am looking for extra part time income.
That in itself poses a problem. Unless you can find people in your own social circle that you could advise of your part time repair facility then you will otherwise have to go 'public' and let the wider public know - this exposes you to working to a timescale as anyone offering kit for repair will naturally expect a schedule for the return of it.

In other words you could be painting yourself into a corner and getting too much work and, if you aren't prepared to fix it 'pronto' you could end up with a poor reputation for turn-around.

If you are confident you can repair the stuff - or even just offer advice on whether or not it is recoverable - and have the tools etc then start in your own social circle and immediate neighborhood. A notice in the local shops (if they have public bulletin boards?) might also help. Don't go mad for payment either - start small (even 'free') and when your confidence and reputation build then you can ask for either a fixed fee or create a scale of charges (hourly etc).

I used to offer a 'no fix, no fee' service and a fixed price of £25 (plus parts at cost). If equipment wasn't fixable then I'd offer un-biased advice on sourcing replacements (I'm talking about marine electronics principally) and either ask for the old, unrepairable, kit to break for spares or even offer a small fee to take it off their hands. This process managed to build up a stock of spares that often came in useful for other jobs.

Being 'old' myself I'm more familiar and at home with the older marine gear and a lot of boat owners feel the same way so are loathed to let older stuff go - this gives me an edge over the youngsters in this market as they'd inevitably suggest the most modern and up-to-date replacement (more often than not on a commission basis too) and not even attempt a repair as they are 'board swappers' rather than component-level repair people.

As Martin (above) said though - and as I've inferred - the older equipment is probably your best point of attack. Modern stuff is 'pointless' on a cost basis but old kit has its fan base and a growing popularity. Don't look at it on a 'buy it, fix it, resell it' basis but more as a 'servicing and restoration' business. You could even start getting people interested in older equipment by buying and restoring one or two items and then showing people what you can do (before and after pictures). Someone will inevitably want to buy a restored unit off you! There's plenty of old kit available on eBay more often than not sold as 'spares or repair'.

You will (might) have to spend a little to get started though - not a lot, certainly under $100 would see you on your way - and please, please join a forum dedicated to such repair/restoration work as the advocates are mightily knowledgeable and very willing to help even beginners to get started in the subject.
 

roughshawd

Jul 13, 2020
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I am the independent researcher. The mux of the sitrep is like this. All devices are designed to do a certain job. That means that each is its own functioning part. When you try to eat an apple with the core, you have to remember that some appleseeds have more cyanide in them than others, and you might feel ill. (PLURAL) So in the condition that a system has a body, a mind and a fuel source, it isn't really a simple device anymore is it? I have been trying to figure this one out for most of my life, and this is the second time I have caught you following me around! heh heh haha hahahah hohohoho hahahhaha!!! I would say that I am serious about electronics, but that doesn't mean I am perfect, and it looks like I might goof up now and again. Look at it this way. The world is turning eastward, everywhere, but the right hand rule says that the power only goes in one direction in the coil, what if I point my thumb Westward? what then>??
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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and this is the second time I have caught you following me around!
If you want to hide then going elsewhere than a public forum is the way to do it.

I can't figure you (or your intent) out. Much of what you post is 'gibberish' and not conducive to forming a proper response - such as:

All devices are designed to do a certain job. That means that each is its own functioning part. When you try to eat an apple with the core, you have to remember that some appleseeds have more cyanide in them than others, and you might feel ill. (PLURAL) So in the condition that a system has a body, a mind and a fuel source, it isn't really a simple device anymore is it? I have been trying to figure this one out for most of my life,

Advice doesn't seem to do anything (not just mine) for your situation so perhaps you need to do what you want and not bother asking for advice at all?
 
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