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will wallwart blow my machine?

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medusa569

Apr 7, 2010
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I received back a frequency generator with a different walwart than i sent it away with. My question is will the different walwart possibly do damage to my machine if i try and use it?? my old transformer was marker input 120vac60 hz/ output 12vdc 500ma. THe new walwart that was mistakenly given back to me is marked input 100-120 vac0.3a/output +12v- 1A. The replacmeent seems to be punier in build and heft so I don't need to blow out an $800.00 frquency generator. thank you in advance.


medusa
 

(*steve*)

¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd
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The new one is rated for the same input voltage and the output differs only in that it is capable of supplying more power.

I would suggest that the old unit had a transformer in it and the new one is a switchmode power supply.

If this has been supplied by the supplier of the equipment then it will be fine. If not, then it is still highly unlikely to pose a problem.
 

NickS

Apr 6, 2010
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I agree with what Steve said. And just wanted to point out that "punier in build and heft" is not always a bad thing. Your old bulky/heavy supply was likely a much less efficient linear supply. so you are in a win/win situation on the new supply(unless you wanted to recycle all that copper inside the old one).
 

medusa569

Apr 7, 2010
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Thank you for your replies. Being an electronics novice I was extremely worried of blowing an $900.00 piece of equipment because my repairman
switches my transformer without asking me. I also read somewhere that sometimes the increased power although small can cause some problems. Yes it is called a switching adapter .
 

roughshawd

Jul 13, 2020
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I want you to understand, all professional electronics guys are not the same. I have been told over and over by electronics masters that switching power supplies are better than linear ones. I do know that if you don't supply enough power, that it will harm your device. The truth is in the pudding... A master knows what your equipment does, and generally can make good decisions on what to do when things go wrong. But me on the other hand, I can't figure how much amps a device is going to use based on the schematic or based on ideal circuits. To me, it's not a toss up matter, either replace things with the exact components; Or do all the tests to ensure the replacement will work... sorry for the negative attitude, but a device that costs that much, is one that has more engineers than just you and me behind it.
 

Minder

Apr 24, 2015
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I want you to understand, all professional electronics guys are not the same. I have been told over and over by electronics masters that switching power supplies are better than linear ones. A master knows what your equipment does, and generally can make good decisions on what to do when things go wrong. sorry for the negative attitude, but a device that costs that much, is one that has more engineers than just you and me behind it.
I am not completely in line with that, I always use linear supplies where at all possible, and if the application will support it.
I have retrofitted and serviced CNC and other industrial electronics for many decades, and in the main I have found linear supplies virtually indestructible and outlast many current linear supplies.
Some applications such as motor control, which can apply stress on a supply, I would NEVER apply a switching ver.
I generally put together my own, using a Toroidal mains transformer. OK, so they cost a little more initially, but customer satisfaction outweighs the cost.
 

bertus

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Hello,

Also linear power supplies are less sensitive to power dips and surges.
A switched power supply may fail when a couple of power dips are seen in a short time.

Bertus
 

Minder

Apr 24, 2015
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...... also trying to repair them is often a futile task.
 

kellys_eye

Jun 25, 2010
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...... also trying to repair them is often a futile task.
Maybe not exactly futile but the concept of a SMPS is driving components to their limits/saturation which stresses inevitably take their toll. This would be less of an issue if the bean counters weren't the driving force behind their design. Engineers will always find ways to 'make it work' but once the finance department gets a hold of a project.....
 

danadak

Feb 19, 2021
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I would load the new supply with a 1A load and let it cook for a couple of days.

$800+ is not a toy, so caution is a good idea. And you dont know in 99% of these
wall warts what failure modes look like, so putting a inline fuse would not hurt.

Regards, Dana.

PS : I should follow my own advice, more than once have not. So far only hosed
once a minor piece of gear, over many years.
 

davenn

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This is a 13 year old thread that @roughshawd unfortunately responded to.

thanks everyone

time to close it
 
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